Content Standard Social Studies Standard B - History: Time, Continuity, and Change

Content Standard: Students in Wisconsin will learn about the history of Wisconsin, the United States, and the world, examining change and continuity over time in order to develop historical perspective, explain historical relationships, and analyze issues that affect the present and the future.

Rationale
Students need to understand their historical roots and how past events have shaped their world. In developing these insights, students must know what life was like in the past and how things change and develop over time. Reconstructing and interpreting historical events provides a needed perspective in addressing the past, the present, and the future. In Wisconsin schools, the content, concepts, and skills related to history may be taught in units and courses in United States and world history, global studies, geography, economics, anthropology, sociology, psychology, current events, and the humanities.

Note: additional information for developing a curriculum is available in:

Curriculum Standards for Social Studies. The National Council for the Social Studies Publications, P.O. Box 79078, Baltimore, MD 21279-0078 (1-800-683-0812)

National Standards for History. National Center for History in the Schools, University of California, Los Angeles, 1100 Glendon Avenue, Suite 927, Box 951588 (1-310-825-4702)

Building a History Curriculum: Guidelines for Teaching History in Schools. National Council for History Education, 26915 Westwood Rd., B-2, Westlake, OH 44145 (1-440-835-1776)

Building a United States History Curriculum. National Council for History Education, 26915 Westwood Rd., B-2, Westlake, OH 44145 (1-440-835-1776)

Building a World History Curriculum. National Council for History Education, 26915 Westwood Rd., B-2, Westlake, OH 44145 (1-440-835-1776)

FOURTH-TWELFTH GRADE


Historical Eras and Themes

While studying Wisconsin history, students in grades 4-12 will learn about:

  1. the prehistory and the early history of Wisconsin's native people
  2. early explorers, traders, and settlers to 1812
  3. the transition from territory to statehood, 1787-1848
  4. immigration and settlement
  5. Wisconsin's role in the Civil War, 1860-1865
  6. mining, lumber, and agriculture
  7. La Follette and the Progressive Era, 1874-1914
  8. the world wars and conflicts
  9. prosperity, depression, industrialization, and urbanization
  10. Wisconsin's response to 20th century change

FIFTH-TWELFTH GRADE


Historical Eras and Themes

While studying United States history, students in grades 5-12 will learn about:

  1. the prehistory and early history of the Americas to 1607
  2. colonial history and settlement, 1607-1763
  3. the American Revolution and the early national period, 1763-1815
  4. the paradox of nationalism and sectionalism in an expanding nation, 1815-1860
  5. the Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861-1877
  6. the growth of industrialization and urbanization, 1865-1914
  7. World War I and America's emergence as a world power, 1890-1920
  8. prosperity, depression, and the New Deal, 1920-1941
  9. World War II, the Cold War, the Korean War, and the Vietnamese conflict, 1941-1975
  10. the search for prosperity and equal rights in Cold War and post-Cold War America, 1945-present

FIFTH-TWELFTH GRADE


Historical Eras and Themes

While studying world history, students in grades 5-12 will learn about:

  1. prehistory to 2000 BC
  2. early pastoral civilizations, nonwestern empires, and tropical civilizations
  3. classical civilizations, including China, India, Egypt, Greece, and Rome, 1000 BC to 500 AD
  4. multiple religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism) and civilizations to 1100 AD
  5. expansion and centralization of power, including the decline of feudalism, 1000-1500 AD
  6. the early modern world, 1450-1800 AD
  7. global unrest, change, and revolution, 1750-1850 AD
  8. global encounters, industrialization, urbanization, and imperialism, 1850-1914 AD
  9. wars, revolutions, and ideologies, 1900-1945 AD
  10. post-industrialism, global interdependence, and fragmentation in the contemporary world, 1945-present