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Scheduling

Students wearing masks and doing schoolwork outdoors

Scheduling

Districts are thinking creatively about how to get students ready for the 2021-22 school year. Some districts are running their traditional programming while others are running their traditional programming as well as a week-long “jump start” to the school year. It is important to remember that summer school programming is voluntary for students.

Consider how you will provide collaboration and planning time for summer learning instructors, time for instruction, and time to allow for both individual check-in time and the opportunity to assess student work and provide high-quality feedback. Depending on learning environments, schools may be scheduling for concurrent instructional models. It is also important to consider options to accommodate flexible schedules based on family needs.

Guiding Questions 

  • What type of schedule will best accommodate your target population and goals?
  • Are scheduled activities organized to be easy to understand and consistent for students and families?
  • Will educators have appropriate planning time to plan instruction, collaborate with colleagues, communicate with families, provide feedback to students, and individualize instruction as needed?
  • To what extent does the schedule allow for asynchronous learning opportunities for secondary students (who may be balancing jobs or family responsibilities)?
  • For students and families for which internet or device access may be difficult, how will you ensure that any synchronous or online activities are accessible at other times or formats (e.g., recordings, printed packets, etc.)?
  • How are you prioritizing opportunities to develop and foster relationships in the schedule? Do students have opportunities each day to engage in social-emotional activities?
  • Do teachers have adequate time to prepare instructional activities based on available evidence about student learning? To offer specific, timely, and actionable feedback to students?
  • How can school districts work with community partners to support expanded learning during the summer?

 

Scheduling for Student Success

As planning teams consider who has been most impacted by pandemic schooling and in what ways, schedules can be shaped to meet these needs. Sample scenarios follow.

Scenario A

During the 2020-21 school year, some students attended in person (“room”) while others attended virtually (“Zoom”). As the planning team looks to the 21-22 school year, they recognize that both “room” and “Zoom” students are needing engaging programming that promotes joy as well as having time for targeted instruction. Many families are working during the summer and would benefit from all-day programming.

In this scenario, summer programming has a thematic lens for engagement as well as for coherence of learning. It ensures students are engaging in a well-rounded education (e.g., social studies, science, environmental education, civic engagement, and arts education) as well as provides “learning stations” for targeted instruction. Programming is sustained: 5 days a week for 5 weeks.

*Note: If the summer school programming is supplemental or considered academic enrichment support (not core instructional time), then it could be funded through use of available 21st Century Community Learning Center grant funds.

An in-person weekly schedule for K-8 students might look like this:

Week 1: Wild for Learning! -- Kindergarten

  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
8:00-8:30 Arrival and Breakfast Arrival and Breakfast Arrival and Breakfast Arrival and Breakfast Arrival and Breakfast
8:30-9:30 Learning Stations Learning Stations Learning Stations Learning Stations Learning Stations
9:30-10:30 Arts Block Arts Block Arts Block Arts Block Arts Block
10:30-11:30 Learning Stations Learning Stations Learning Stations Learning Stations Learning Stations
11:30-12:00 Lunch Field Trip to the Zoo Lunch Lunch Lunch
12:00-12:30 Outside Play Field Trip to the Zoo Outside Play Outside Play Outside Play
12:30-1:00 Well-being Field Trip to the Zoo Well-being Well-being Well-being
1:00-2:00 STEM Lab in the Jungle Field Trip to the Zoo STEM Lab in the Jungle Safari Field Day Activities STEM Lab in the Jungle
2:00-2:30 PE Field Trip to the Zoo PE Safari Field Day Activities PE
2:30-3:30 Computer Lab Computer Lab Computer Lab Computer Lab Computer Lab
3:30-4:00 Closing Circle Closing Circle Closing Circle Closing Circle Closing Circle
4:00-5:00 Free Play/Dismissal Free Play/Dismissal Free Play/Dismissal Free Play/Dismissal Free Play/Dismissal

Sample Grades K-8 Daily Schedule

Time Activity Description
8:00-8:30 Arrival and Breakfast Students transition into classrooms and/or breakfast. Classrooms include independent activities.
8:30-9:30 Learning Stations

Students transition through two 30-minute learning stations.

9:30-10:30 Arts Block Students participate in visual art, dance, theatre, culinary, or music class. Students could participate in a different art each day or week.
10:30-11:30 Learning Stations Students transition through two 30-minute learning stations.
11:30-12:00 Lunch Students eat lunch.
12:00-12:30 Outside Play Students play on playground equipment or outdoor toys and participate in outside activities.
12:30-1:00 Well-being Students participate in activities from the school’s Social and Emotional Learning Program or other well-being activities.
1:00-2:00 STEM Lab Students participate in STEM activities.
2:00-2:30 PE Students participate in physical education or health activities
2:30-3:30 Computer Lab Students participate in computer activities that build keyboarding and application skills.
3:30-4:00 Closing Circle Students participate in a team building/closing activity for the day.
4:00-5:00 Free Play/Dismissal Students pack belongings and dismissal transition occurs. Students participate in free play until families arrive to check students out.

Schedules have been adapted from the Louisiana Department of Education’s Summer Learning Program Guidance 2021
 

Scenario B

During the 2020-21 school year, while some students attended in person, the district offered an all-virtual option for students. As the planning team looks to the 21-22 school year, they recognize the students who opted into all virtual schooling a) may not have had in-person, social interactions with their peers in more than 12 months, b) may have experienced a significant amount of self-directed learning time while at home, and c) may no longer be accustomed to a regimented schedule.

In this scenario, summer school may focus on a) reintroducing peer interactions, b) providing a structured project-based environment where students can explore their own interests while gaining academic skills, and c) participate in a flexible schedule to help prepare them for a regular school schedule in the fall. A morning-only approach like this might be offered for 5 consecutive weeks or might be scheduled for several one-week intervals throughout the summer to help students ease back into in-person learning. An in-person schedule for these students might look like this:

K-8 Sample Weekly Plan

Thematic Lens: What’s Growing In My Community?

  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
8:00-8:30 Arrival and Breakfast Arrival and Breakfast Arrival and Breakfast Arrival and Breakfast Arrival and Breakfast
8:30-9:30 Circle with SEL Circle with SEL Circle with SEL Circle with SEL Circle with SEL
9:30-10:30 STEM Project-Based Learning STEM Project-Based Learning STEM Project-Based Learning STEM Project-Based Learning STEM Project-Based Learning
10:30-11:30 Learning Stations Learning Stations Learning Stations Learning Stations Learning Stations
11:30-12:00 Closing Circle Closing Circle Closing Circle Closing Circle Closing Circle

Schedules have been adapted from the Louisiana Department of Education’s Summer Learning Program Guidance 2021

Scenario C

During the 2020-21 school year, a group of high school students did not engage in synchronous remote learning and are behind in credits. Upon further investigation, the planning team found many of these students’ families had lost sources of income during the pandemic and students were unable to participate due to increased work schedules to support their families or were needed to supervise younger siblings while adult family members worked. Attending in-person or synchronous virtual summer school is not an option for these students due to continued work and family commitments.

In this scenario, summer school may be focused on credit recovery*. Due to the barriers these students are facing, planning teams may find that an asynchronous course approach paired with one-on-one weekly sessions with these students may be the most beneficial. An asynchronous schedule may look like this:

  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
AM Block Weekly faculty meeting Individual check-ins for academics and wellness with students in-person, by phone, or online Office hours, planning, preparation, and feedback Individual check-ins for academics and wellness with students in-person, by phone, or online Office hours, planning, preparation, and feedback
PM Block

Individual check-ins for academics and wellness with students in-person, by phone, or online

Office hours, planning, preparation, and feedback online

Individual check-ins for academics and wellness with students in-person, by phone, or online

Office hours, planning, preparation, and feedback online

Individual check-ins for academics and wellness with students in-person, by phone, or online

Perhaps asynchronous courses are offered for 4 weeks, encouraging students to complete two courses during the summer or perhaps students participate in two courses at the same time that are spread out over the full summer.

*Districts with 21st CCLC grants may consider using this funding to support credit recovery programs.

Scenario D

A district is planning to offer in-person programming for grades K-6 and will be virtual programming for grades 7-12. Through communication with families, the planning team identified a group of students who lack reliable internet access and support. This district also has a 21st CCLC grant or works closely with a partner organization with 21st CCLC funding. In this scenario, a schedule may look like this (additional requirements under the 21st CCLC grant guidelines may apply):

  K-6 in-person 7-12 virtual with in-person support
AM Block 1 Whole-class team building activities and cooperative learning Virtual course delivery with a supplemental or supervisory in-person option staffed and funded by 21st CCLC program.
AM Block 2 Project-based learning supporting student inquiry experiences exploring a community/place-based topic. SEL learning supports included throughout. Virtual course delivery with a supplemental or supervisory in-person option staffed and funded by 21st CCLC program.
AM Block 3 Teacher-facilitated mini-lessons introducing or reinforcing skills—such as research methods, note-taking, project management—or concepts necessary for success in the project-based inquiry. Virtual course delivery with a supplemental or supervisory in-person option staffed and funded by 21st CCLC program.
Lunch

Lunch / Transition / Recess

(Not all students may attend afternoon, Instructional staff changes to 21st CCLC funded staff)

Lunch / Transition / Recess

(Not all students may attend afternoon, Instructional staff changes to 21st CCLC funded staff)

PM Block 

In-person enrichment programming staffed and funded by 21st CCLC program . May include 1 hour activity rotations with regular breaks for SEL-focused activities. Activity examples may include:

  • Service-learning
  • Community gardening
  • Outdoor learning
  • Arts
  • Recreation
  • Club-based activities
  • Mentor activities
  • Tutoring

In-person enrichment programming staffed and funded by 21st CCLC program . May include 1 hour activity rotations with regular breaks for SEL-focused activities. Activity examples may include:

  • Service-learning
  • Community gardening
  • Outdoor learning
  • Arts
  • Recreation
  • Club-based activities
  • Mentor activities
  • Tutoring

 

 

 

For questions about this information, contact Tamara Mouw (608) 266-2364