You are here

Title I Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Targeted Assistance Programs

What is a Targeted Assistance program?

A Targeted Assistance program is one in which individual students are targeted to receive Title I services. Students are identified based on multiple, objective, educationally related criteria. Services may be delivered in a number of ways: in-class instruction; pull-out instruction; and/or extended day, week, or year instruction. Title I teacher(s) are responsible for providing supplemental services to identified children; coordinating with other school personnel involved with the children; and involving parents in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of the Title I program. For more information, visit: Targeted Assistance Guidelines

Utilizing Title I Paraprofessionals in a Targeted Assistance Program

In a targeted assistance school, can the Title I teacher participate in an equitable MLSS?

Yes. Title I services are one piece of the continuum of services available to students. Title I teachers should still be providing supplemental educational support to a select group of students determined as Title I-eligible by a review of multiple measures of academic progress. The school should have explicit criteria for when students enter the Title I program and explicit criteria for when students exit the Title I program. Title I teachers collaborate with regular classroom teachers in identifying Title I students. Title I teachers may consult with regular classroom teachers to design classroom interventions that the teacher would implement before a student is identified as Title I eligible. However, the Title I teacher should not be delivering those interventions as they are designed for non-Title I students. Title I teachers should never be used to deliver the core instruction provided to all students even if that instruction is differentiated. Title I teachers deliver education services over and above the core instruction. Title I services should never reduce a student's access to the core instruction.

What role can Title I instructional paraprofessionals play in the implementation of an equitable MLSS in a targeted assistance school?

Paraprofessionals work under the direct supervision of a highly qualified teacher whose responsibilities include, but are not limited to, supporting the lesson plan of a properly licensed teacher, providing technical assistance to the teacher, and helping with classroom management. Paraprofessionals hired with Title I funds are specifically assigned to support students receiving Title I services under the direct supervision of a highly qualified teacher. This could include supporting a Title I student's participation in the school's RtI system. Title I paraprofessionals should not provide interventions to general education students. For more information on Title I paraprofessionals, see Bulletin 03.02 ESEA Update: Paraprofessionals-Frequently Asked Questions.

Can Title I funds be used to purchase instructional materials to support the equitable MLSS system in a targeted assistance school?

If the district is purchasing particular materials for all schools in the district, those materials must be purchased with state or local funds in both Title I and non-Title I schools. In a targeted assistance school, Title I funds may only be used to purchase instructional materials for Title I students in the Title I program. Title I funds may never be used to purchase instructional materials in non-Title I schools.

How do multi-level systems of supports work within the Title I targeted assistance programming? What parameters do we need to be aware of as we implement an equitable MLSS?

When implementing an equitable MLSS in a targeted assistance school, staff must ensure that the students served by Title I teachers and the services those teachers provide are consistent with Title I law. In a targeted assistance school, Title I teachers work only with Title I-eligible students and the services they provide are above and beyond what non-title students are receiving and supplemental to the core instructional program. This must be foremost in consideration when determining which level Title I services would best be placed.

In a targeted assistance program, what role can Title I teachers play in the new Specific Learning Disabilities (SLD) rule?

In a targeted assistance program, Title I teachers should continue to serve Title I identified students and provide the necessary supplemental interventions to these students. These documented interventions with the Title I teacher may meet the standards of an intensive intervention required as part of a SLD eligibility decision. For more information on the SLD criteria and its definition of "intensive interventions," see Programs for Students with Specific Learning Disabilities and Role of Special Education in an equitable MLSS guidance.

Schoolwide Programs

How may Title I funds be used to support an equitable MLSS in a schoolwide school?

Schoolwide programs, allowable in buildings with at least 40% poverty upon submitting their schoolwide application, are designed to serve the educational needs of all students within the school. In order for any activity to be allowable in a schoolwide, the activity must be reflected both in the school's comprehensive needs assessment and schoolwide plan. As is the case with all actions and strategies on schoolwide plans, if it is being funded with Title I funds, its effectiveness on increasing student achievement will need to be evaluated annually. For more about schoolwide programming, see Title I Schoolwide Programs.

Title I funds combined with other resources may be used to fund any aspect of an equitable MLSS in a schoolwide school. In a schoolwide program, the district must take appropriate measures to ensure that they are not supplanting state and local funds with federal Title I funding.

In addition, districts may set aside a portion of their IDEA Part B funds to be used within Title I schoolwide schools to support any part of their schoolwide plan. For more information on this option, see IDEA - Title I Schoolwide Set-Aside.

The U.S. Department of Education has an informative power point on this topic titled, Implementing RTI Using Title I, Title III, and CEIS Funds.

Teachers and Licensure

Which teachers can teach in a Title I targeted assistance program?

Title I teachers must be appropriately licensed for the grade and content at the time of hire.

Which teachers can teach in a Title I Schoolwide school?

All teachers in a Title I Schoolwide school must be appropriately licensed for the grade and content.

If an individual holds an emergency license, are they appropriately licensed?

A teacher who holds an emergency license for the grade and content is appropriately licensed.

What are the licensure requirements for teachers who provide Title I intervention?

Licensure Requirements for Providing Students with Interventions and Additional Challenges

When must an elementary-licensed teacher hold a reading teacher license?

A reading teacher license is required for the following assignments:

  • If the individual teaches more than one period of reading per day; beyond universal/core instruction.
  • If the reading assignment is part of a Title I targeted assistance program;
  • If the reading assignment is part of a reading recovery program (not part of a self-contained classroom).

When must a secondary-licensed teacher hold a reading teacher license?

A reading teacher license is always required for a secondary teacher to teach reading.

What license must a teacher hold in order to teach a program such as READ 180?

A reading teacher license is required for all teachers teaching READ 180.

Must a substitute teacher be appropriately licensed to hold a Title I position?

A substitute teacher must be appropriately licensed for the Title I assignment if they teach or work with students for 45 or more consecutive days. It is strongly recommended that shorter term substitute teachers and paraprofessionals meet the ESSA requirements. Please note that a substitute teacher who is not appropriately licensed cannot be funded by Title I.

Paraprofessional Requirements

Must all paraprofessionals who work with students in a Title I program meet ESSA criteria?

All paraprofessionals who work in a Title I targeted assistance program must meet ESSA criteria at the time of hire.

Which paraprofessionals must meet ESSA criteria in a Title I schoolwide school?

All paraprofessionals in a schoolwide school must meet ESSA criteria. This includes special education paraprofessionals.

How does a paraprofessional demonstrate meeting ESSA criteria?

In order to be qualified, a paraprofessional must hold a high school diploma and have completed two years of post-secondary education (48 credits) or an associate's degree or have met a rigorous standard of quality and be able to demonstrate knowledge of and the ability to assist in instructing reading, writing, and mathematics (or, as appropriate, reading readiness, writing readiness, and mathematics readiness) by taking and passing one of the Hiring Requirements Options.

Must a substitute paraprofessional be qualified to hold a Title I position?

A substitute paraprofessional must be qualified for the Title I assignment if they work with students for 45 or more consecutive days. It is strongly recommended that shorter term substitute paraprofessionals meet the ESSA requirements. Please note that a substitute paraprofessional who does not meet the requirements cannot be funded by Title I.

For questions about this information, contact Title I and School Support Team (608) 267-3721