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Library Director Continuing Education & Recertification

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Forms

 
  1. Application and Renewal Form
  2. Continuing Education (CE) Activity Report
  3. Annual Summation of CE Activities

Continuing Education Activities for Recertification

 

Learning takes place in a variety of situations and circumstances, and librarians have many opportunities for formal and informal involvement in learning activities throughout their professional careers. For the purposes of public librarian recertification, however, only those learning activities that are planned, coordinated, administered, and evaluated in terms of learning objectives qualify for recertification.

Continuing library education for Wisconsin public librarian certification renewal is interpreted as education of the individual beyond the initial certification requirements. Continuing library education is required to:

  • Keep librarians abreast of new knowledge and developments within their field
  • Update their basic library-oriented education
  • Enhance their job competence
  • Lead to specialization in a new area of librarianship

Continuing education opportunities include both formal and informal learning situations and need not be limited to library subjects or the offerings of library education programs but must be related to the present position or to career advancement in the library profession and contain the following four elements of a CE activity.

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Elements Needed to Count CE Activity
 

  1.  Learning objectives
  2.  Activities that are used to meet the objectives
  3.  A process for evaluation to determine whether the learning objectives were met
  4.  An instructor or learning consultant 

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Continuing Education Categories

Eligible continuing education activities typically fall into three categories as follows. Activities in these categories may be offered onsite or in a variety of other ways, such as via the Internet (online) or satellite. At least 70 of the 100 contact hours required for recertification must be earned in categories A and B. No more than 30 of the 100 contact hours required for recertification can be earned in category C. At least 10 contact hours required for recertification must be technology-related.

Category A: Credit Continuing Education Activities


This category includes all continuing education courses for which academic credit is awarded by a college or university approved by an accrediting association of more than statewide standing. In addition, courses determined by the Division for Libraries and Technology to be equivalent to courses offered for academic credit should be included in this category. These include the onsite and online courses offered by the School of Library and Information Studies, UW-Madison​,  iSchool.

Contact hours earned in Category A must be submitted with formal documentation (certificate or a transcript) from the sponsoring agency.

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Category B: Noncredit Continuing Education Activities

This category includes activities for which no academic credit is awarded but which are planned continuing education activities on specific topics offered by agencies, organizations and professional associations, and are planned, coordinated, administered, and evaluated in terms of learning objectives.

Participants in activities in Category B must document their participation by submitting a Continuing Education Activity Report form to CE & Certification consultants that includes provider, title and description of program, date(s), location, and number of contact hours. Category B includes activities such as:

  • New Library Director Orientation
  • Workshops, seminars, institutes, lectures
  • State or national library association programs
  • Leadership role (chair) in a professional library association (e.g. WLA, WAPL, ALA, etc.)
  • Participated in a leadership program intended to enhance the library profession (Youth Services Institute)

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Category C: Self-Directed Continuing Education Activities


This category includes self-directed continuing education activities for which no academic credit or equivalencies are awarded and which are not preplanned continuing education activities on specific topics offered by agencies, organizations and professional associations. The learning activities, however, must be planned, coordinated, administered, and evaluated in terms of learning objectives.

Determination of the number of contact hours to be awarded for activities in this category will be made by the participant’s consultant, based on actual hours of continuing education activities, but not to exceed 10 contact hours awarded per learning activity (each bulleted item signifies a single learning activity). Certification participants are advised to consult with the certification consultant prior to participation in a self-directed learning activity, particularly if they aren’t sure whether an activity qualifies. Participants in activities in Category C must document their participation by submitting a Continuing Education Activity Report form to their consultant.

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Examples of learning activities that may qualify if they meet the above conditions are:

  • Reviews of books in the field of library science or related to librarianship authored and published in the library/media-related field and read primarily by those in the profession.
  • Instruction (courses, workshops, seminars, presentations, poster sessions, conferences, programs) given to information, library, or media-related groups.
  • Participation in professional library association activities of a significant nature, such as serving as chair or member of a major committee or as an officer in the association (e.g., serving on the WLA literary awards committee or as president)
  • Listening to and/or viewing a webinar or other form of media providing a workshop presentation or conference program. (If this is done as part of a group situation sponsored by an agency or organization and with organized discussion, it may qualify under category B above.)
  • Exchange-of-position programs (learning in another library for a specified period).
  • Internships for which no academic credit is awarded.
  • Consultation or one-on-one instruction received.
  • Publications (a book or a chapter thereof, a paper, or an article) authored and published in the library/media-related field and read primarily by those in the profession.
  • Steering Committee, Work Group, Conference Planning (“… not to exceed 10 hours per learning activity.”)
  • Webinars (see below)

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Webinars

Webinars are learning activities; however, they must be planned, coordinated, administered, and evaluated in terms of learning objectives to be eligible for public librarian re-certification. They must be related to career advancement in the library profession. When in doubt, ask your public library system continuing education consultant.

Independently watching live (or archived) webinars that are sponsored by other organizations can count toward recertification under Category C, self-directed study. The number of hours that can be claimed under Category C is limited to 30 out of 100 over the 5 year certification period.

Webinars could be considered a Category "B" or "C" Activity

If a public library systems sponsor or co-sponsor webinars and participants are given the opportunity to chat/discuss/email with each other or with the instructor, that is considered a Category B activity. The important element to remember about webinars asking yourself:

  • Is the activity designed to keep the director abreast of new knowledge and developments within the library field
  • Does the activity enhance job competence or lead to a specialization in a new area of librarianship

B category webinars can be Synchronous or Asynchronous. Synchronous learning refers to a group of people learning the same things at the same time during which there could be chat or interaction with the instructor. Asynchronous learning is online learning, part of which is done when an individual has time and part involves live chat, email or some other form of communication with the instructor and/or the other students. An example of a category B webinar MAY be found on the UW Library School’s continuing education website. A recorded webinar, without the opportunity for interaction or participation of any kind, is recorded as category C.

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Find Online Learning (e.g. Webinars and other courses)

Activities include webinars, MOOCS (classes, many of which are offered freely or for a small fee to obtain a certificate) by universities for online learning), and participation in a library-related leadership institute, or workgroup that has statewide implications. When in doubt a director should clarify that an activity will qualify with the CE coordinator for their public library system.

WebJunction and  InfoPeople offer online learning opportunities that are both active and passive (e.g. archived webinars). There are online courses offered by Gale (e.g. if your library subscribes to the database) and Gale/Ed2Go courses that require a fee, BUT if you take a course through the public library (for free -- $99 value) they are called "Gale Courses."

MOOCs (i.e. massive open online course) began as a model for delivering free learning content online to any person who wants to take a course, with no limit on attendance. They were usually offered by colleges and universities, but many corporations have begun offering them as well. A person can obtain a certificate of attendance if the entire course is completed.

There are many online learning tutorials located in GCF Learn Free.org. Learning Express Library has wonderful online tutorials for learning about test taking, improving one’s math skills to prepare for college exams, and creating a job resume.

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Technology Activities Suitable for Certification Requirements

At least 10 hours of the 100 continuing education hours of regular re-certification must be technology related.  Technology-related learning activities are planned, coordinated, administered, and evaluated in terms of learning objectives. A qualifying technology-related activity may fall into any one of the three broad categories above as a distinct activity or it may be included as a component of a course, workshop, or program. Directors are advised to consult with the CE/certification consultant prior to participation in a self-directed learning activity, particularly if they are not sure whether an activity qualifies.  Among the learning activities that may qualify if they meet the above conditions are:

  • Training on newly-installed modules or major upgrades of an automated integrated library system (ILS)
  • Application training in the redesign of websites

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Continuing Education Activities Contact Hours Chart:

Category Type of Activity Unit of Measure  Contact Hours*

A

At least 70 contact hours must be
earned in categories A and B.

Credit Continuing Education Activities
(Require formal documentation from
sponsoring agency)

Academic Courses

Semester Credit
Trimester Credit
Quarter Credit

Approved Credit
Equivalency Courses


 

 




1 credit
1 credit
1 credit

60 minutes


 

 




15
14
10

1

B


At least 70 contact hours must be
earned in categories A and B.

Noncredit Continuing Education Activities
Require written summaries)


Workshops, Seminars, Institutes, Lecture Series,
Technology Training
State or National Library Association
Conferences

 


Semester Audit
Trimester Audit
Quarter Audit

 

 

60 minutes

 

1 day
1/2 day


Equivalent

1 credit 
1 credit 
1 credit 

 

 

1


6
3




15
14
10

C

No more than 30 contact hours,
not to exceed 10 per learning
activity, from category C can be applied to recertification 
requirements
Self-Directed Continuing Education Activities

 

Other Learning Experiences

 



60 minutes

 



1

*A portion or all of the contact hours may be technology-related for purposes of re-certification.

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CEUs, Contact Hours, and Credits

CEUs are nationally recognized units for professional continuing education. One CEU is approximately equal to 10 contact hours. CEUs do not transfer to graduate credit. Graduate credits can only be earned by enrolling in graduate level courses.

Contact Hour is 60 minutes of continuous participation in a learning activity.

Credit – Applicants for initial certification must have the educational requirements for the applicable grade level of library for which they are applying. (e.g. Master’s degree in Library and Information Studies, bachelor’s degree or 54 credits, etc.)

Semester courses are longer than public library certification courses; 16 weeks/semester and 12 weeks/certification course. Semester courses (for academic credit) are worth more contact hours than the noncredit certification courses. Each CEU is worth 10 hours. 3 CEUs are worth 30 hours. Three (3) semester credits are worth 45 hours.

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Continuing Education Activity Report

A Continuing Education Activity Report is a MS Word form completed for each activity that a director has participated in throughout a five-year recertification period. The report forms are submitted to library system certification consultants for approval. The components of the activity report include the title of the program, a description of program contents, and how the program assisted you in your present library position or library career advancement. The form is a record for the library director and the system consultant that a workshop session, webinar, conference, etc. was attended. It is also intended to be a reflection of an activity’s usefulness to a director’s current or future library position.Below is an example of information contained in an activity report.

Example of a CE Activity Report
 

Title of Program: Technology Training Skills for 21st Century Library Staff

Description of Program: This session was all about learning to assist library customers in learning how to use a computer.  

Relationship of Program to Present Position: Up until now I assisted library staff maintain their workstations by checking for windows updates and keeping virus protections up to date. As a director of a small library with few staff, I need to develop technology skills to assist patrons find the information that they need through computer use. There are unemployed persons in the community who come to the library and need assistance accessing the internet, completing forms and updating resumes.So, attending this session gave me presentation ideas that I can use to help people on a one-on-one basis.

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Activities that Do Not Count as Continuing Education

Learning activities for which no academic credit is given and which are not designed to keep librarians abreast of new knowledge and developments within their field, update their basic library-oriented education, enhance their job competence, or lead to specialization in a new area of librarianship do not qualify as continuing education activities for purposes of public librarian recertification. Among the activities not likely to meet those criteria are the following:

  • Business, committee, planning, and advisory meetings at the local library, system or state level
  • Training on regular library operations or procedures
  • Program planning meetings
  • Regular staff meetings
  • Preparation of internal manuals and guides or other internal documents
  • Professional association activities which are routine in nature (e.g., serving on the WLA elections committee)
  • Published reviews of books not in the field of library science and not related to librarianship
  • Reading professional journals

Below are two examples of activities that do not qualify as continuing education:

1. A director presented a program to a library-related group as part of book club discussion. The preparation, meeting, reading reviews and maintaining the minutes took many hours. However, This is not an eligible CE activity because it is considered part of the director’s job. It may be a voluntary part of a director’s job to do programming. However, CE is considered an opportunity to learn new skills to improve as a director through course work or some other structured learning activity.

2. One of the activities that "counts" is the review of books in the library field. A director identified a book related to the library profession and asked whether the time spent reading and reflecting upon the book was considered a learning activity. The bulleted learning activity above is intended for persons who have reviewed books for the library profession. Credit for reading books is not awarded unless you review manuscripts for a professional journal or give a presentation based on the information.

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For questions about this information, contact Shannon Schultz (608) 266-7270