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Lesson Planning Resources

The lessons plans, instructional resources, and curriculum included on this webpage have been selected to illustrate ways in which teachers can integrate and infuse American Indian Studies content into their classroom or school district. The information from each of these resources can be woven into a school district’s curriculum through a balanced, comprehensive, and aligned framework adaptable to local circumstances.

Furthermore, each of these suggested resources are intended to help teachers and students of all ages and in all communities make the connection between the knowledge, skills, and ways of knowing for teaching and learning about Native people, cultures, and nations.

*The inclusion of any material or resources on this page should not be construed as an endorsement or recommendation by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. Educators are encouraged to preview all the resources and materials and to use their own judgment about appropriateness depending on grade level and/or class preparedness.
 

Academic Standards 


The Wisconsin Academic Standards specify what students should know and be able to do in the classroom. The Wisconsin’s Guiding Principles for Teaching and Learning inform the design and implementation of all academic standards. The Literacy in All Subjects is a resource that is created for educators to provide the space to spark discussion, share, and network about disciplinary literacy in their subjects matter. Each of the following links serve as goals for teaching and learning. 

Course, Unit, and Lesson Plan Templates

 
The course plan, unit plan, and lesson plan provide guidance around instructional planning for including, integrating, or infusing American Indian Studies content into a classroom.
 

WISELearn: Wisconsin's Educator Portal
 

WISELearn provides a centralized location for connecting Wisconsin educators and sharing classroom and professional learning resources. This free site brings Wisconsin content to one easy-to-search spot. The website includes the following information:

BadgerLink

 
From personal interest to educational research, BadgerLink is Wisconsin's Online Library, providing Wisconsin residents with licensed content not available through regular search engines. The website includes the following information:
 

Native Knowledge 360°

 
Native Knowledge 360° (NK360°) from the National Museum of American Indian (NMAI) provides educators and students with new perspectives on Native American history and cultures. NK360° provides educational materials and teacher training that incorporate Native narratives, more comprehensive histories, and accurate information to enlighten and inform teaching and learning about Native America. Furthermore, NK360° challenges common assumptions about Native peoples—their cultures, their roles in United States and world history, and their contributions to the arts, sciences, and literature. NK360° also offers a view that includes not only the past but also the richness and vibrancy of Native peoples and cultures today. The following information in available on the website:
 

Lessons of Our Land

 
Lessons of Our Land teaches the Native American story of this land from historical to modern times. The developed the curriculum provides students with broader insight and understanding of land, cultures, inherent rights and tribal sovereignty. The larger goal of the initiative is to have people identify with the land they live on and be better prepared to solve the difficult issues that impact communities on or near reservations today. Although Lessons of Our Land positions Native American tribal issues and values at the forefront, the curriculum emphasizes the fundamental relationship between land and people in general, not just Native Americans. The following information in available on the website:
 

POSOH Project (Teaching Resources)

 
The POSOH Project has three units for middle and high school grade levels that are place-based and culturally relevant and support conceptual science teaching and learning. The POSOH Project define place-based and culturally relevant curricula as follows:
 

Place-based Curricula: “Place” refers to the shared geographical, ecological, and sociocultural context of a particular region. In our case, place refers to the Wolf and Fox River Watersheds of northeast Wisconsin. Each of our three POSOH Units was designed in collaboration with people in our place to address local priorities and locally relevant science concepts. Learning materials that are place-based are designed explicitly in the context of the place where they are used and the people with whom they are used. The learning outcomes in place-based curricula include location-specific learning goals; place is used throughout the materials in connection to understanding key concepts and not simply as a motivator or hook. The underpinning intention of these place-based curricula is that learners will develop a stronger connection to their place by learning with these materials, encouraging natural opportunities for taking local stewardship action to emerge.

Culturally Relevant Curricula: Our work draws from the culturally relevant pedagogies approach to designing innovative learning materials. POSOH curricula promote science learning experiences that: 1) validate the value of cultural ways of understanding the natural world as important human knowledge and as contributing to the current body of scientific knowledge, with or without formal acknowledgement, 2) engage students in rigorous science learning based on a science inquiry model that articulates the development of evidence-based explanations as an effective path to promote academic achievement in science, 3) engage students and teachers in cultural learning and intercultural competency, 4) support students and teachers to reflect on the personal relevance of their cultural and science knowledge and learning processes, and 5) incorporate elements of pedagogy and local stewardship actions that are supported by and emerge from the local cultural community.

Here are the teaching materials and resources listed on the website:

Gikinoo’wizhiwe Onji Waaban (Guiding for Tomorrow) or G-WOW

 
The G-WOW curriculum is a unique approach to increasing awareness environmental issues impacting and affecting Lake Superior’s coastal environment, people, cultures, and economies that is organized into four seasonal units corresponding to these traditional Ojibwe lifeways:
 
Each of these traditional practices depends on the sustainability of a key plant or animal species with place-based evidence of environmental impacts that is affecting traditional Ojibwe lifeways and people of all cultures. The initiative also includes a teachers corner with the following information:
 

Ojibwe - Waasa Inaabidaa: We Look In All Directions

 
“Waasa Inaabidaa--We Look In All Directions” is a documentary series showcases the vibrant Ojibwe culture in six hour-long episodes. Each episode spans nearly five hundred years of history, from pre-contact to contemporary times. The six programs focus on Ojibwe language, leadership, economic development, education, health, and the Ojibwe relationship to the environment. Teacher’s guides for each episode will be easily accessible through our informative and educational website. Here is the list of the six program that are part of the series:
 
Furthermore, this series features over one hundred interviews with tribal elders, historians, youth, and leaders from the 19 Ojibwe Bands in Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. Combined with three thousand archival photographs and on-camera testimonials by noted regional historians, this captivating series informs the public about contemporary Ojibwe culture and life. Original and historical artwork combined with dramatic portrayals poignantly illustrates the four seasons traditional life cycle of the Ojibwe, as well as the radical effects of the fur trade and European contact. Powerful contemporary and archival footage and still photographs bring to life intimate portraits of Ojibwe culture and history.

 

Sacred Little Ones Project: We Will Make a Path for Our Children

 
The College of Menominee Nation’s Sacred Little Ones Project is an early childhood instruction model to enable Menominee children to gain academic skills, motivation, support, and confidence necessary to succeed in elementary education. The program is being developed within existing infrastructure for program sustainability. The following information in available on the website:
 

Culture-Based Arts Integration Curriculum

 
The Culture-Based Arts Integration Curriculum website seeks to enhance interest, understanding, enthusiasm, and performance in standards-based subjects among American Indian and non-American Indian students in grades K-8. Furthermore, the website supports students and teachers understanding of Ojibwe culture and art and then work with project staff to design lesson plans in order to integrate this new knowledge into their existing curricula. The lesson plans are available on the link above website for teaching and learning. The following information in available on the website:
 
For questions about this information, contact David O'Connor (608) 267-2283