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Language Instruction Services

Language Instruction Services: WISEdata

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Federal and State laws require schools to provide language instruction educational programs (LIEP) to English learners. The language instruction services (LIS) data element describes which language program or language services an English learner is receiving.

Language instruction services (LIS) data element is different than Language of Instruction. Refer to the Language of Instruction data element page for more details. 

For this data element, report all of the services a student is receiving for the current reporting period. A primary LIEP service must be indicated with a true/false indicator. The primary LIEP is the one in which a student spends the majority of their time.

This data element should NOT be reported for non-ELs (former ELs). LIEP data elements are incorporated into the WISEdata report, Student Language Instruction Program Association (SLIPA).  

A list of the LIEP codes and a short description are listed below. Longer descriptions of each LIEP type can be found in the next section of this page (Points to Note, Long Description, and Use Cases). When choosing which LIEPs to implement, districts should refer to DPI’s LIEP Crosswalk.

Bilingual and dual language instruction includes methods of study designed specifically for students whose native language is not English, delivered either in English or primarily in the native language of the students. However, bilingual and dual language programs may serve as world language programs for students enrolled in those programs who are not English Learners (non-ELs).

USES: Language instruction data will be used for disaggregated reporting and accountability purposes, including State Report Cards, ESSA Report Cards, and Title III. 

BILINGUAL PROGRAMS
CODE Short Description
BI-AIHL American Indian Heritage Language Bilingual
BI-DLDB Dual Language Education - Developmental Bilingual
BI-DLTW Dual Language Education - Two-Way Bilingual
BI-HL Heritage Language Bilingual
BI-INTSPED Bilingual - Integrated SPED
BI-NEW Newcomer Bilingual
BI-TBEE Transitional Bilingual - Early Exit
BI-TBLE Transitional Bilingual - Late Exit
OTHER Other researched-based LIEP not described in the LIEP crosswalk
ENGLISH as a SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) PROGRAMS
CODE Short Description
ESL-CB Content-Based ESL
ESL-INT Integrated ESL
ESL- INTSPED ESL- Integrated SPED
ESL-NEW Newcomer ESL
ESL-SA Stand Alone ESL/ELD
ESL-SI Sheltered ESL Instruction
OTHER Other researched-based LIEP not described in the LIEP crosswalk
MISSING LANGUAGE PROGRAMS or REASONS for NO LIEP
CODE Short Description
MISS No LIEP Available: ELs receive academic instruction in a mainstream classroom and have no contact with a licensed EL or bilingually certified educator or LIEP programs described above. Support structures for English Learners and staff serving ELs is not continuous nor evident in the district or school-wide plans.
REF Caregiver Refusal: Caregiver opts out of LIEP services offered by the district for the current year. Students retain their EL status and the district remains obligated to take the affirmative steps and appropriate actions, required by federal law, to provide access to its educational programs.

 

 

Bilingual Program Points to Note, Long Description, and Use Cases

  1. American Indian Heritage Language Bilingual: American Indian indigenous language and English, used to facilitate language, literacy, and/or academic content learning. Indigenous language is used for less than 50% of daily core instructional time. Language is being renewed/reclaimed in the community.

  2. Dual Language Education - Developmental Bilingual: Minimum of 50% of daily core instruction in partner language. Language of instruction guided by the program's language-content-time allocation policy (90/10, 80/20, 50/50).

  3. Dual Language Education - Two-Way Bilingual: Pre-K through grade 5, with program continuation into secondary school. Minimum of 50% of core instruction in partner language in grades PK-5. Language of instruction guided by the program's language-content-time allocation policy (90/10, 80/20, 50/50). High school dual language education programs include a minimum of two courses annually in the partner language.

  4. Heritage Language Bilingual: Heritage language is used for less than 50% of daily core instructional time

  5. Bilingual-Integrated SPED: ELs with Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) could be served within all LIEP environments. This category is for ELs with significant cognitive disabilities.

  6. Newcomer Bilingual: Newcomer programs are generally stand-alone learning environments designed to meet the socio-cultural, language, and academic needs of newly arrived immigrants. These programs prepare newcomers with readiness to transition to regular LIEPs.

  7. Transitional Bilingual-Early Exit: Students’ home language is used, in addition to English, to teach academic content. As proficiency in English increases, instruction in the students’ home language decreases. Transition to all English is complete by mid-to-late elementary school, typically within 1-3 years.

  8. Transitional Bilingual-Late Exit: Students’ home language is used, in addition to English, to teach academic content. As proficiency in English increases, instruction in the students’ home language decreases. Transition to all English is complete by late elementary school, typically 4-6 years. The key difference from a developmental bilingual program is if the amount of instruction in the partner language falls below 50%.

Non-ELs Enrolled in Dual Language Programs:

  • Do not report an LIEP or LIS for non-ELs enrolled in dual education programs.

    • These students may be reported as World Language students. Refer to DPI's Programs data element page for more information about World Language programs. 

ESL Program Points to Note, Long Description, and Use Cases

  1. Content-Based ESL: Instruction in which content is used as the medium for building English Language skills, the primary focus remains on learning English.

  2. Integrated ESL: Serving EL/ELP<5 (mainstream), EL/ELP<4 ( if, ELs Only).

    Also known as Push-In or Co-teaching, this course is for English Language Development. It is facilitated when an EL educator or EL educator supported paraprofessional pushes into the general education setting. The EL teacher or paraprofessional may be supporting ELs during a mini-lesson or waiting for instruction to be complete before working in a small group with ELs. Content teachers may be supported in language proficiency development. Language(s) of Instruction will primarily be English, and ELs will be integrated with non-ELs.

  3. ESL-Integrated SPED: ELs with IEPs should be served within all LIEP environments. This category is ELs with significant cognitive disabilities.

  4. Newcomer ESL: Newcomer programs are generally stand-alone learning environments designed to meet the socio-cultural, language, and academic needs of newly arrived immigrants. These programs prepare newcomers with readiness to transition to regular LIEPs.

  5. Stand-Alone ESL/ELD: Special Instruction in English in which English Learners are served outside of the general classroom or enrolled in specialized ESL classes.

  6. Sheltered ESL Instruction: Instruction that includes both language and content simultaneously. Primary focus is on academic content learning with the acquisition of English being part of the instructional outcomes.This could include any,or a combination of the following: Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP), Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE), or Guided Language Acquisition Design (GLAD).

MISSING Language Program Courses / OTHER Reasons for No LIEP - Long Description and Use Cases

  1. No LIEP Available (MISS): ELs receive academic instruction in the general classroom and have no contact with a licensed EL or bilingually certified educator or LIEP programs described above. Support structures for English Learners and staff serving ELs is not continuous nor evident in the district or school-wide plans.
  2. Caregiver Refusal (REF): Caregiver opts out of LIEP services offered by the district for the current year. Students retain their EL status and the district remains obligated to take affirmative steps and appropriate actions, required by federal law, to provide access to its educational programs.
  3. Other: Other researched-based LIEP not described in this crosswalk. Program must be described for review and approval in the End-of-Year Report as outlined in the state approved ESSA LEA Plan (item 17 in WISEgrants).

Additional Resources

Refer to the Language Instruction Data Reporting Help page as well as the LIEP Data Element Crosswalk for FAQs and use cases.


 
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