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Frequently Asked Questions - Substitute Teaching

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Questions

  1. What is the difference between the Five-Year Long-Term Substitute license and the Three-Year Short-Term Substitute license?
  2. How long can an individual with a Three-Year Short-Term Substitute license be in a specific assignment?
  3. How long can an individual with a Five-Year Long-Term Substitute license be in a specific assignment?
  4. How can an individual show they've successfully completed the substitute teacher training for the Three-Year Short-Term Substitute license?
  5. What are the requirements to be a long-term substitute?
  6. I hold a substitute license and work at my school district as an instructional aide. According to my district, I need to take some classes in the next two years. I'm thinking about taking Psychology courses. Would those courses fulfill the requirement to maintain my substitute license?

Answers

1. What is the difference between the Five-Year Long-Term Substitute license and the Three-Year Short-Term Substitute license?

  • The Five-Year Long-Term Substitute license may be issued to an applicant who has completed a state-approved educator preparation program through an accredited four-year bachelor degree granting institution. See the Five-Year Substitute License Requirements page for more information.
  • The Three-Year Short-Term Substitute license may be issued to a person who holds an associate's degree or higher from an accredited degree granting institution, but has not completed a state-approved educator preparation program. See the Three-year Short-Term Substitute License Requirements page for more information.

2. How long can an individual with a Three-Year Short-Term Substitute license be in a specific assignment?

The Three-Year Short-Term Substitute license allows the holder to accept short-term substitute assignments in any subject at any grade level (no more than 45 days total in a specific assignment).

3. How long can an individual with a Five-Year Long-Term Substitute license be in a specific assignment?

The Five-Year Long-Term Substitute license allows the holder to accept long-term substitute assignments in the subject and grade level in which they are licensed (more than 45 days total in a specific assignment).  The Five-Year Long-Term Substitute license also allows the holder to accept short-term substitute assignments a subject and grade level outside of their license (no more than 45 days total in a specific assignment).

4. How can an individual show they've successfully completed the substitute teacher training for the Three-Year Short-Term Substitute license?

The following are acceptable forms of documentation:

  • CESA or WEAC Certificate of Completion, including date of completion.
  • Confirmation letter of successful completion, on district letterhead, including date of completion, signed by an authorized Administrator.
  • PI-1633 Substitute Teacher Training Verification Form

5.  What are the requirements to be a long-term substitute?

PI 34.23 states "a long-term substitute shall be a licensed teacher or a licensed substitute teacher; however, a long-term substitute may be employed only in the subject and grade level in which the teacher is licensed."

An individual holding only a Three-Year Short-Term Substitute license cannot serve as a long-term substitute unless they have been issued a One-Year License with Stipulations. Please see the One-Year Licenses with Stipulations page for more information.

6.  I hold a substitute license and work at my school district as an instructional aide. According to my district, I need to take some classes in the next two years. I'm thinking about taking Psychology courses. Would those courses fulfill the requirement to maintain my substitute license?

No coursework is required to renew the substitute license. However, your school district may have a continuing education requirement as a condition of employment. You must contact your school district to find out about continuing education requirements.

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